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What is Shannon Wiley looking forward to at this year's Asembia Specialty Pharmacy Summit? Find out more>


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Primary Care Providers Win Challenge of CMS Interpretation of Enhanced Payment Law

With the help and support of the Tennessee Medical Association, 21 Tennessee physicians of underserved communities joined together and retained Bass, Berry & Sims to file suit against the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to stop improper collection efforts. Our team, led by David King, was successful in halting efforts to recoup TennCare payments that were used legitimately to expand services in communities that needed them. Read more

Tennessee Medical Association & Bass, Berry & Sims

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Download the Healthcare Fraud & Abuse Review 2017, authored by Bass, Berry & Sims

The Healthcare Fraud & Abuse Review 2017 details all healthcare-related False Claims Act settlements from last year, organized by particular sectors of the healthcare industry. In addition to reviewing all healthcare fraud-related settlements, the Review includes updates on enforcement-related litigation involving the Stark Law and Anti-Kickback Statute, and looks at the continued implications from the government's focus on enforcement efforts involving individual actors in connection with civil and criminal healthcare fraud investigations.

Click here to download the Review.

Labor Talk Blog: Mental Impairments: When Can an Employer Require a Fitness-for-Duty Exam?

Firm Publication


March 15, 2016

Employers often must balance the mandates of seemingly competing directives. A challenging example arises in the area of possible mental impairment. An employer may hear concerns that an employee is acting abnormally, or has hinted at a desire to hurt herself, or is exhibiting other possible signs of mental impairment. The employer does not wish to stereotype the employee unfairly, or unlawfully "regard" the employee as disabled; yet, the employer also must ensure a safe work environment for other employees and others on the premises.

The employer often considers whether it can (or whether it must) require an employee to submit to a fitness-for-duty examination. Two recent cases with differing results provide guidance on the delicacy of this balance. image


To continue reading the content in this article on the firm's Labor Talk blog, please click here to view the post.

Bass, Berry & Sims' Labor Talk blog features news, commentary and insights on the complicated and constantly changing labor and employment laws affecting employers.


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