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How did Mike DeAgro's experience co-founding a nonprofit advocacy organization lead to a career in the legal field? Find out more>

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Envision to Sell to KKR for $9.9 Billion

We represented Envision Healthcare Corporation (NYSE: EVHC) in its definitive agreement to sell to KKR in an all-cash transaction for $9.9 billion, including debt. KKR will pay $46 per Envision share in cash to buy the company, marking a 32 percent premium to the company's volume-weighted average share price from November 1, when Envision announced it was considering its options. The transaction is expected to close the fourth quarter of 2018. Read more


Envision Healthcare

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Six Things to Know Before Buying a Physician Practice spotlight

Dermatology, ophthalmology, radiology, urology…the list goes on. Yet, in any physician practice management transaction, there are six key considerations that apply and, if not carefully managed, can derail a transaction. Download the 6 Things to Know Before Buying a Physician Practice to keep your physician practice management transactions on track.

Click here to download the guide.

Privacy Perils: The Multi-Factor Authentication Process

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December 11, 2015

No matter how strong an online password may be, cybercriminals unfortunately devise methods to obtain passwords, sometimes using technical devices called keyloggers. Given the vulnerability of passwords, an increasing number of businesses and online platforms are requiring additional forms of authentication to gain access to networks or personal data. This approach, called multi-factor authentication, adds another layer of protection against data breach and acts as a safety net when a password is compromised.

How does multi-factor authentication work? It involves multiple methods of identifying data, which typically fit into the following categories:

  • What you know, i.e., a password, PIN number, security question or recognition of a familiar photo
  • What you have, i.e., a USB drive, smart card or portable token featuring a rotating code for the holder to input in the computer
  • Who you are, i.e., biometric identification such as fingerscanning, retina scanning or voice recognition

An authentication process that involves more than one of the above categories is considered multi-factored. On the other hand, a combination of more than one verification method within a given category (i.e., a password plus a security question), while it may involve multiple steps, still qualifies as single-factored authentication and is generally less secure than a multi-factored authentication process.

Beyond the use of strong passwords, a multi-factor authentication provides increased data security.

Privacy Perils imageCheck out our series, Privacy Perils, to learn what steps you can take to guard your personal and company data. For more information about this topic and other cyber security concerns, please contact Bob Brewer, Tony McFarland, Elizabeth Warren or a member of our Privacy & Data Security team.

 


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